Texas residents file petition to secede

November 13, 2012

After the election results last week, some Texans want to take their marbles and go home.

As of 9:30 a.m., a group about the population of Victoria have signed a federal petition to get Texas to secede from the Union.

"The US continues to suffer economic difficulties stemming from the federal government's neglect to reform domestic and foreign spending. The citizens of the US suffer from blatant abuses of their rights such as the NDAA, the TSA, etc. Given that the state of Texas maintains a balanced budget and is the 15th largest economy in the world, it is practically feasible for Texas to withdraw from the union, and to do so would protect it's citizens' standard of living and re-secure their rights and liberties in accordance with the original ideas and beliefs of our founding fathers which are no longer being reflected by the federal government."

Gov. Rick Perry's spokeswoman said Monday that he doesn't support the petition. "Governor Perry believes in the greatness of our Union and nothing should be done to change it," spokeswoman Catherine Frazier told The Dallas Morning News. "But he also shares the frustrations many Americans have with our federal government."

Fraizer's statement goes on to say that the country, more than ever, needs Texas' leadership.


While Texas isn't the only state whose residents are petitioning for secession - North Carolina, Alabama and Kentucky are also petitioning - it is the only state to reach the required 25,000 signatures for President Barack Obama to review it.

For more information about annexation, Texas State Library and Archives Commission has you covered.

The gist of it is, it's not going to happen. It's not even an option.

"Texas received no special terms in its admission to the Union," according to the commission. "Once Texas had agreed to join the Union, she never had the legal option of leaving, either before or after the Civil War."