Student plans to work through medical school

Editor, the Advocate:

My name is Jonathan Hyak, and I want to clarify the printing of a couple of recent articles published in the Advocate about me. The articles gave the impression to some that I am asking for donations to attend medical school. That is incorrect. I intend to work my way through school to the best of my ability.

It was quite a shock to see the articles. But despite the surprise, it is always incredible to be reminded of the support I can find in my hometown. Furthermore, the steady, stoic support of my family and friends has been omnipresent throughout my life. This support system, however, is not something that all college and graduate school aspirants can count on. There are students who have struggled much more than I have trying to achieve their dreams; these are the students who need communities to rally behind them.

Though I must admit, I am proud to claim one thing mentioned in one of the articles: Texas 4000. Last summer, I was able to be a student director for a wonderful organization that seeks to spread hope, knowledge and charity in the fight against cancer. We do this by raising funds, using those funds to give grants and cycling from Austin to Anchorage, Alaska, interacting with the cancer-fighting communities along the way.

During the past 10 years, Texas 4000 has raised more than $4.5 million for cancer research and survivorship programs and will surpass the $5 million mark this summer. As the fight against cancer is ongoing, so, too, is Texas 4000. Each year, a new team will need support. And since those recent articles got us in the donating spirit, check out texas4000.org to learn more and possibly even donate.

If nothing else, take this opportunity to learn about and/or donate to any charity of your choosing. Some of my personal favorites are Camp Kesem and Dance Marathon. Locally, I know organizations like CASA and the Red Cross are doing fabulous things.

Jonathan Hyak, Victoria